Shipwreck on the Han River Rapids

RESEARCH MATERIALS REPOSITORY 2019

 

Documents, mainly PDF and Word and papers and some KML files providing background information or draft materials developed for the research being undertaken between Canberra, Hanzhong and Xi'an in 2019. The PDF files can be read directly using Acrobat Reader and other materials need to be downloaded.

 

You are welcome to direct questions and comments to David Jupp via email at dlbjupp@ozemail.com.au

 

 

Fr. David in the Qinling

 

The first area of activity for 2019 is in relation to the visit of the French missionary Monsieur L’Abbé Père Jean Pierre Armand David (CM, 1826-1900, 谭卫道, Tan Weidao) to Hanzhong in 1873. Fr. David (Fr. Stands for “Frater”, “Frère” or “Brother” as a general term for a Member of a catholic order) was a natural scientist who made three journeys to China and “discovered” many animal and bird species such as the Panda and the Père David’s deer. His third “voyage” included areas on the north and south of the Qinling. In coming to Hanzhong from the Guanzhong he travelled the old road previously called the Baoxie Road. In Hanzhong he also made geological and biological discoveries before setting off on the Han River for Hankou. He was unfortunately boat-wrecked but was unharmed. His diary of the third visit was published as:

 

David, M. L’Abbé Père Armand (1875). Journal de mon troisième voyage d’exploration dans L’Empire Chinois. 2 volumes, Paris, Libraire Hachette et Cie.

 

The Table below provides access to a number of documents and materials. First, two PDF files of his diary (Vol 1 and Vol 2) are included. If the printed books are needed they can be provided by post. The files are searchable. Next, a PDF file has been included with two extracts from a document by DLBJ that has been in progress for some years. Material from the draft document has already been used in other documents such as the “Shu Roads Introduction” and “Catholics on the Shu Roads” to be found on this Qinling Plank Roads to Shu web site. The two extracts included here are a general introduction to Fr. David and his visits to China and a description of the journey along the Baoxie Road.

 

The expeditions in the north and south of the Qinling have also been presented as a Google Earth KML file. This KML file and the Word document version of the two extracts above have been bundled as a ZIP file for use and information. The draft document also has material covering Fr. David’s work in the northern Qinling and some of the activities in Hanzhong and on the Han River. These last sections are incomplete. If it is useful, some more sections of the document can be edited with extra translations added and then provided when needed.

 

 

Travels of Fr. Armand David in 1873

 

Journal_de_mon_troisieme_voyage_v1.pdf (10MB)

Searchable PDF of Volume 1 of Fr. David's third voyage to China:
M. L’Abbé Père Armand David (1875). Journal de mon troisième voyage d’exploration dans L’Empire Chinois. 2 volumes, Paris, Libraire Hachette et Cie.

Journal_de_mon_troisieme_voyage_v2_search.pdf (10MB)

Searchable PDF of Volume 2 of Fr. David's third voyage to China:
M. L’Abbé Père Armand David (1875). Journal de mon troisième voyage d’exploration dans L’Empire Chinois. 2 volumes, Paris, Libraire Hachette et Cie.

extracts_from_the_travels_of_Fr_David.pdf (2MB)

PDF of 2 Extracts from a work in progress translating and discussing Fr. David's travels in China to the northern and southern Qinling and his travel on the Baoxie Road in 1873.

Fr_David_Extracts_KML.zip (1MB)

Zip file of the MS Word version of the Extracts from the work in progress and a draft KML file for his travels discussed in the Extracts. The ZIP format should invoke a download request rather than attempt to open the file.

 

The Kangxi Maps and the Chamadao

 

The second Table is a set of references to published papers or documents. They cover some previous work by various people that provide important background information for the question we are asking about a path taken by Jesuit and Chinese map makers in their survey of Shaanxi. The surveys occurred between 1712 and 1714 as part of the work leading to the "Kangxi Maps". Some additional information about the Kangxi Maps can be found on this web site under the "Kangxi Jesuit secret map of 1721".

 

The first two papers in this Table are PDF files of papers published by DLBJ on the Kangxi maps and on the projections of the European copies of the Kangxi maps. The third and fourth are versions of a Chinese paper, published in 1990, by Wang Qianjin (汪前进). He proved that the projection of the Copperplate Kangxi Map was sinusoidal. This was used in the first two papers by DLBJ. The third paper is the Chinese language version and the fourth paper is a translation of the third paper into English so that English speakers can see what he did. The fifth document is Wang Qianjin's PhD Thesis. It is very comprehensive but only available in Chinese.

 

The sixth paper in the Table is one published by a Prof. Han Qi (韩琦) in a book about the Kangxi maps and the European maps that were developed from them. Unfortunately, Prof Han’s paper seems only to be in English. Footnote 1 of the paper says:

 

“The author is Professor in the Institute for the History of Natural Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Professor Han Qi's essay has been translated from Mandarin Chinese into English by Annie Lam.”

 

If the original Chinese version of the translated paper can be found it will be a very significant step. The translation is not easy to use to find Chinese references and some hard to understand areas will certainly be resolved by looking at the Chinese language. It is much better to read what the Professor wrote in order to truly appreciate his information. So, possibly the first step of the Project is to find where these people are now and to see if the Professor’s paper was ever made available in Chinese? If the Chinese version exists, it will help us all to undertake the planned work. Prof. Han and Prof. Wang Qianjin were both at the Research Institute for History of Natural Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences. ( 中国科学院自然科学史研究所)

 

The seventh paper is by some young people at the Centre for Historical Geographic Studies, Fudan University, Shanghai, China. They repeated the work of Wang Qianjin but sought to apply statistical methods that may be applied to other situations like this on. Perhaps they know where the original authors can be found?

 

These six papers and PhD Thesis provide the background. Perhaps the first step is to become familiar with the Kangxi maps and their history and then look at some specific questions regarding the surveys in Shaanxi and possibly Sichuan?

 

The Kangxi Map and the Chamadao

 

jupp_Cartographica_52.3_Kangxi_Map.pdf (26MB)

Paper published in Cartographica by David Jupp reference:
Jupp, David L.B. (2017). Projection, Scale, and Accuracy in the 1721 Kangxi Maps. Cartographica, 52(3), 215-232. (DOI:10.3138/cart.52.3.2016-0004)

jupp_Globe_NLA_24pp_1-24a.pdf (11MB)

Paper published in the Globe by David Jupp concerning the European copies of the Kangxi map. Reference:
David L. B. Jupp (2018). Determining projection and scale for maps in early atlases of China held by the National Library of Australia.  Journal of the Australian and New Zealand Map Society Inc., 84, 1-24.

Wang_Qianjin_draft_CH.pdf (500KB)

Chinese version of the paper published by Wang Qianjin on the projection used in the Kangxi Map. Reference:
Wang, Qianjin (1991). A new investigation of the projection of the copper plate version of the Kangxi “Complete map of the imperial domain”, Studies in the History of Natural Science, Vol. 10 No. 2 (1991) (In Chinese)
康熙铜版《皇舆全览图》投影种类新探; 汪前进(者)《自然科学史研究》笫10卷第2期(1991年):186一194。

Wang_Qianjin_draft_EN.pdf (600KB)

English (translated) version of the paper published by Wang Qianjin on the projection used in the Kangxi Map. Reference:
Wang, Qianjin (1991). A new investigation of the projection of the copper plate version of the Kangxi “Complete map of the imperial domain”, Studies in the History of Natural Science, Vol. 10 No. 2 (1991) (In Chinese)
康熙铜版《皇舆全览图》投影种类新探; 汪前进(者)《自然科学史研究》笫10卷第2期(1991年):186一194。

Wang_Qianjin_Thesis_1990_Editable.pdf (12MB)

Editable Doctoral Thesis by Wang Qianjin on Kangxi Maps including the projection used. Reference:
Wang, Qianjin (1991). Research into the cartographic surveys and the Kangxi “Complete map of the imperial domain”, PhD Thesis (In Chinese)
《皇舆全览图》测绘研究,汪前进(者),博士论文,中国科孚院自然科学皇研究所,1991年。

Cartography_during_the_Times_of_the_Kang.pdf (7MB)

Paper by a Chinese expert on the times of the Jesuit astronomers and cartogrophers and the Chinese developments of the times. Prof. Qi Han published this paper in English as part of a Symposium. The paper notes it was translated by a Chinese named Annie Lam. However, the Chinese version has (unfortunately) not yet been found. It has many references to Chinese papers and books but they are hard to find without having a full and complete reference in Chinese. The material is very important to understand the Chinese context of the Kangxi Maps. Reference:
Han Qi 韩琦. 2006. "Cartography during the times of the Kangxi Emperor: The age and the background." In Jesuit mapmaking in China: D’Anville’s Nouvelle atlas de la Chine (1737), ed. R.M. Ribeiro and J.W. O’Malley, 51–62. Philadelphia: Saint Joseph’s University Press. [English translation of Chinese manuscript by Annie Lam].

Lu_etal_2011_Shanghai_Projection_Stats.pdf (600KB)

Paper by researchers at the Center for Historical Geographic Studies,Fudan University,Shanghai, China. They repeat the work on the projection for the Kangxi Map by Wang Qian but apply general statistical methods to prove his conclusion. Reference:
Lu Junwei, Han Zhaoqing, Zhu Xuanlin, and Qian Hao. 2011. 陆俊 巍,韩昭庆,诸玄麟,钱浩者,康熙《皇舆全览图》投影种类的统计分析 [A statistical analysis on the projection type applied in Huang Yu Quan Lan Tu]. 测绘科学[Science of surveying and mapping] 36 (6): 16–27. [In Chinese].

 

Back to Main Shu Roads Page